Sjøforklaring 1939 - 1945

Informasjonen nedenfor vedr. skip i Nortraships flåte er direkte avskrift av orginalkilden "Sjøforklaringer fra andre verdenskrig (1940 - 1945)". Informasjonen her er fra sjøforklaringer holdt under og rett etter krigen og kan derfor avvike noe fra den øvrige kvalitetssikrede informasjonen i Krigsseilerregisteret.

Dato
30. januar 1941
Posisjon
130 miles vest for Galvay
Årsak
Senket av tysk fly
Last
Jernmalm
Reiserute
Lorentzo Marques - Oban
Mannskapsliste
Komplett
Reddet
5
Fanget
0
Omkommet
23 [23]
Savnet
0
  • Referat

    Dato
    19. mai 1941
    Sted
    Dublin
    Administrator
    Mr. E. J. Betson, Consul

    ...

    The Chief Officer Mr. Knut Dykesteen appeared and declared: "I had just left my watch at 8.10 a.m. on 30th January 1941 and went to my cabin. Immediately afterwards I heard an explosion and when I went on deck found that the vessel was being attacked by an aeroplane bearing the German markings. On reaching the deck I saw that a bomb had hit the water line on the port side of the ship, and as the ship was beginning to sink rapidly the crew took the boats. In the meantime the German plane continued flying around the vessel dropping further bombs and at the same time firing with machine guns on the crew. The wireless installation on the ship was destroyed by gun fire. Altogether five bombs were dropped on the ship, the first two hitting the water line and the others dropping around the boat deck thereby destroying some of the lifeboats and only one could be launched and even that was damaged. Sixteen members of the crew were able to get away in the lifeboat and twelve including myself went down with the ship and only six of us came to the surface again. We then succeeded in boarding one of the rafts. Som of the survivors did not wish to board the lifeboat in this damaged condition and I went on board to endeavour to make som repairs with the carpenter and bosun. Most of the survivors however preferred to transfer to the rafts. Eventually after discussion 8 members agreed to travel in the lifeboat and we endeavoured to tow two rafts which held the remaining survivors. On account of the condition of the weather this had to be abandoned next day and it was agreed that the lifeboat should endeavour to reach shore and have assistance sent out to rescue the remaining members of the crew. I remained in charge of the lifeboat which eventuelly landed at Clogher, Ballyferriter, Co. Keryy on the 4th February 1941. On the 2nd February 1941, gthe Bosun Gustav Holbein died in the lifebaat from exposure and the following day the 3rd February Jens Brandvold, Oiler, also died from exposure. On landing the five survivors and myself went to Dingle where I reported the matter to the Custons and to Lloyd's Agents and I was assured that every possible step was taken to try and rescue the remaining members of the crew on the rafts. There has been no sign or trace of any wreckage since that date. The 5 survivors and myself were then placed in hospital for treatment."

    ...

    ERIK DAHL (SAILOR). "I was having my breakfast on the morning 30th January 1941 when I noticed an aeroplane with German markings, through the port hole, approach the ship. I heard the explosion of the first bomb and immediately ran to the boat deck on the starbord side when the second bomb hit the ship. I then got into a lifeboat which was already in the water. The vessel sank in a very short time and the Chief Officer, Carpenter and Bosun carried out temporary repairs to the lifeboat which was badly damaged. However some of the men in the lifeboat preferred to transfer to rafts and only 8 men boarded the lifeboat which towed two rafts which the remainder of the survivors were on. The next day, however, it was found necessary to abandon the rafts owing to bad weather and an endeavour to reach shore. It was agreed that, on reaching shore the occupants of the lifeboat were to have help sent to the rafts. The next day one of the survivors in the lifeboat died from exposure and before reaching Clogher about three days afterwards another man died from exposure also. I believe that the whole position was explained to the authorities in Cogher and we were then transferred to hospital for treatment."

    ...

    EINAR GRAN (CARPENTER). "I was working on the after deck on the morning of the 30th January 1941, when I noticed an aeroplane which I at first believed was British approaching the ship, but shortly afterwards noticed the German markings. Immediately afterwards I saw two bombs falling which struck the ship on the water line on the port side and at the same time the aeroplane began firing with machine guns. I ran down to my cabin to secure my life jacket and when I came on deck again I saw that the wireless installation had been destroyed by machine gun fire. I then went to the starboard side and got into a lifeboat that was already in the water. With the Chief Officer and Bosun I helped to make temporary repairs to the lifeboat which had been damaged. Of the survivors only eight men including myself agreed to remain in the lifeboat while the other members boarded two rafts which were towed by the lifeboat. After one day the weather became very bad ind it was found necessary to cut the rafts from thelifeboat. It was agreed that the lifeboat should endeavour to reach shore and have help sent out immediately to the men of the rafts. The following day one of the men in the raft died from exposure and another man died the following day also from exposure, leaving six of us in the lifeboat which reached Clogher, Ballyferiter, Co. Kerry on the 4th february 1941. I understand the Chief Officer reported the whole position to the authorities there and we were then sent to hospital for treatment."

    ...

    ARMAND ANDREASSEN, O.S "I was on watch at thesubmarine guns on the morning of the 30th of January 1941 when I suddenly saw an aeroplane diving at us. Before I could do anything the aeroplane had dropped two bombs which hit the ship on the water line on the port side. I immedieately ran to the lifeboat on the starboard side and got into a lifeboat which was already in the water. This lifeboat was very badly damaged and the Chief Officer together with the ship's Carmpenter and Bosun carried out some repairs. As most of the survivors preferred to transfer to rafts, which were towed by the lifeboat containing 8 members, including myself. On account of very bad weather we had to cut the rafts from the lifeboat on the following day, and it was decided that the lifeboat under the charge of the Chief Officer should make for land, and have help sent out immediately to the men on the rafts. On the following day one of the men in the lifeboat died from exposure and yet another died before we succeeded in reaching Clogher, Ballyferriter, about five days after our vessel was attacked. We were then placed in hospital for treatment."

    ...

    OLA NORDAHL (THIRD ENGINEER). "Just before taking my breakfast I went on deck at about 8.5.a.m. on the 30th January 1941 and I immediately heard machine gun fire. I then saw an aeroplane bearing German markings come over the vessel and drop two bombs which struck the ship on the water line, on the port side. I then went immediately to the boat deck on the starboard side. At that moment I saw the aeroplane return over the ship and put the motor lifeboat out of action. Within seven minutes the vessel sank, and of the 10 men who were on board at the time only 5 came up. I was one of the 5. After swimming about in the water for some time I boarded a lifeboat in which were survivors. This lifeboat was in a very damaged condition and some of the men preferred to board rafts as the were afraid of the lifeboat sinking. Som repairs were carried out to the lifeboat and 8 men, including myself, boarded the lifeboat and the two rafts were towed along by the lifeboat. On the next day, owing to bad weather, the two rafts were released from the lifeboat in order that same should reach land and have help sent out to the men on the rafts. During the voyage which lasted about 5 days two men in the lifeboat died from exposure and only 6 of us reached Clogher, Ballyferriter, Co. Kerry where the whole matter was reported to the authorities. We were then placed in hospital for treatment."

    ...